http://www.scoutbase.org.uk

Everything here that you could or should know....

http://scouts.org.uk/

The Official home of Scouting

http://www.scoutshops.com/index.html

For scouting essentials

http://www.stmarkschurch.me.uk/

The Church which sponsors us

www.bansteadscouts.co.uk


www.surrey-scouts.org.uk

Email addresses for ;-

Group Scout Leader 
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All of the leaders 
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The chairman
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The treasurer
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Everyone in the group
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The group executive 
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stgeorge
In 'Scouting for Boys', Baden-Powell referred to the Knights of the Round Table in the Arthurian Legend and to St. George who was their Patron Saint. He then went on:
"He is also the Patron Saint of Scouts everywhere. Therefore all Scouts should know his story. St. George was typical of what a Scout should be.
"When he was faced by a difficulty or danger, however great it appeared, even in the shape of a dragon - he did not avoid it or fear it but went at it with all the power he could ... That is exactly the way a Scout should face a difficulty or danger no matter how great or how terrifying it may appear. He should go at it boldly and confidently, using every power that he can to try and overcome it, and the probability is that he will succeed.
"St. George's Day is April 23, and on that day, Scouts remind themselves of their Promise and Scout Law. Not that a Scout ever forgets either but, on St. George's Day, he makes a special point of thinking about them. Remember this when April 23 comes round again".
So, the Sunday nearest to St. George's Day has become an annual occasion for United Kingdom Scouts to hold ceremonies when they reaffirm their Promise and acknowledge the Scout Law in a national act of dedication.
The legend of St. George, which is an allegory illustrating the triumph of good over evil, tells how he rode into the city of Silene in what is now Libya, to find the people terrorised by a dragon which was fed daily with one of the citizens. The next victim was to be Cleolinda, daughter of the King, but St. George rode out, slew the dragon and freed the people from their oppressor.
Thus, whether in the context of history or legend, to Baden-Powell, St. George epitomised the qualities of selflessness and both moral and physical courage which he saw as being among the aims of Scouting.

 

The Scout Group was founded during September 1954 during a meeting at St. Mark Church hall. The first Boy Scout Master was Mr. Rogerson and Wolf Cub Mistresses were Mrs. Hext and Mrs. Cripps.In 1960, with a loan of £4,000 from the Scout Association, the Group purchased the piece of land in Headley Drive, which was quite remote and adjacent to what then was designated as a future cemetery site, however as it can now be seen the area was developed as housing.A cedar wood building was purchased and erected on the land. This building still remains, although in need of restoration and known as the 'top hut', is at present used for storage.In 1968 Taylor Woodrow Ltd donated one of their disused building site portable building and this was erected on site and being larger than the original 'top hut' the Group facilities were improved. During the 1960’s the Boy Scouts met at the Group's HQ but with the Wolf Cubs continuing to meeting at St. Mark Church hall, however following the completion and fitting out of the donated building the Cubs moved their meetings to the Group's HQ in 1972 which enabled all the members to become one unified Group but continuing the link with St. Mark Church as the sponsor.During the 1960s Group's numbers grew requiring the Wolf Cub section to be divided into two packs, named Greenwood and Downland. In 1968 The Scouting Association's review of Scouting was introduced and in accordance with the majority of Scouts the Group's uniform changed from Scout shorts and 'pork pie' hats to long trousers and berets, Boy Scouts were renamed to Scouts, Wolf Cubs to Cubs, Senior Scouts to Venture Scouts, plus the section leadership names were changed from Master/Mistresses to Leaders.During the 1960/80 period the Groups site, being remote from housing, was able to be used for small camping groups and outside activities but this has been restricted as houses have been built.In 1980 the Scout Association permitted girls to join Venture Scouts, and this has now developed where girls can join all the Scouting sections and the Group conforms to this requirement. In 1985 the Scout Association formed a new section Beaver Scouts and the Group started their Beaver section in 1986. Over the past years the Group has conformed to the Associations changes following ongoing reviews and these have resulted in the head wear, caps & berets, being dropped from the uniform and more recently changes in trouser colour from mushroom to blue, section age changes, Venture Scouts becoming Explorer Scouts and a Network Scout section being formed. Age, weather and vandalism took its toll on the Group's building and so in 2006 yet another second-hand building was acquired to replace the Taylor Woodrow building and this is the current 'Pine-Log' building. For details of this recent change visit Scout Hq.Video of build This is the Group's past, the future depends on you.

We are proud to announce the following awards have been presented recently;

To be updated.....................

Chief Scout Award Gold;